We Stand Together For Change

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

here we go

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

{{**Here is a Title**

[here is a link](https://google.com). This is something *that* i would love to see ***Done***. }}

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

{{As well as something like **this**.}}

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Before you can absorb another word, it’s important to accept a basic truth, as evidenced by irrefutable data. African Americans get racially profiled by police. And are far more likely to have a violent encounter with police than whites. Once you accept this truth, the only logical outcome is to acknowledge this a problem that needs fixing. Of course, fixes are complex and require us to do many things. But it can be done.

Michael Lewis has a fascinating podcast called “Against the Rules.” It’s about the various "referees" in life, from the business world to the sports world, but one story he focuses on is the NBA. You might remember, the NBA had a major threat to its legitimacy after the Tim Dougherty referee scandal. The very league had every bit of its integrity challenged.

Around the same time, two academics were working on a research paper that sought to prove racial bias among NBA referees. The study examined raw data and found that the referees did, in fact, have bias in certain situations. It was a colossal undertaking for the NBA to address this problem.

The strategy involved filming, oversight, peer review and constant referee training (or retraining). But through the intensive overhaul of the system, the NBA refs were supportive of the idea and the process. As a result, the league and the referees were able to greatly reduce the bias in their refereeing decisions during NBA games.

We have a similar but much deadlier situation happening with our law enforcement that makes the NBA drama pale in comparison. It’s a hard conversation to have because we live in two different Americas when it comes to police interactions. Most of white America wants to believe in police forces as “good and noble institutions” (and people), and they mostly are. Our (white) experiences with them are rather limited, and seldom hostile.

African Americans are more likely to have had a different experience. They’re statistically more likely to get pulled over, except at night (when the color of their skin is harder to detect.) Once pulled over, they have more likelihood of having an arrest and/or physical altercation.

Philando Castille was shot in his car in front of his four-year-old daughter while cooperating with an officer. There was Eric Gardner who was choked out of his life saying, “I can’t breathe,” 11-times, executed over allegedly selling “loosies,” single cigarettes sold outside the pack. The same words whispered by George Floyd. The reason people are rioting is because it keeps happening. And that it’s always been happening—we are just seeing it more today thanks to cell phones and the internet.

Many people look at these individual situations and ask, what did the deceased do to deserve this? But—does it matter? Are any of these minor transgressions (if any transgression occurred at all) worthy of a death sentence?

I have had mostly highly positive experiences with law enforcement. A police officer possibly saved my life once when I needed immediate medical care. They’re our frontline protectors from so many things. But there are two aspects of law enforcement that need to change.

Police recruitment needs to stop using the adrenaline pumping, chase-glorifying culture that appears to have taken over the force. Cities need to block these so-called “Live PD” shows that are undercutting the very idea of justice and due process for the townships where they film—not to mention making them look pretty trashy. (If you want to hear more about this, try the podcast “Running from Cops,” By Dan Taberski.)

Unfortunately, there’s a small contingency of police who go into the force so they can “justifiably” use force. The people they deem “bad guy” bear the brunt of all their aggressions and domineering blood lust. Recruitment needs to do a better job of weeding out these bullies. These are not real police officers even if they wear the badge. Which brings the second point.

There are way more good cops than bad cops. Way more. Good people. Save-your-life people. We need these people and they are heroes. But they have to change the Blue Wall of Silence. Good cops need to call bad cops out. Persecute them. Be police, even to other police. If the good folks continue to allow the bad to get away with it, “brother” or not, they are part of the problem.

No one in this country should have to fear government officers. It’s largely the principle behind why this country was founded.

We know through our agency’s work with Community Link (who could really use your donations here, btw), that African Americans in this country have faced systemic discrimination and bias—playing in a rigged game when it comes building generational wealth, or having truly equal opportunity (see: The Color of Law, by Richard Rothstein). Even after fighting for our country, or serving as police officers.

That’s another, highly complicated issue. But at the most basic-rights level, our fellow countrymen should not be afraid to be killed because of the color of their skin.

Like the referees who had bias, all of us need to confront this issue head on. The recent response to this crisis has finally reached a level where people are paying attention. Brands are involved and using their voice to drive change. We can only hope that these same people and brands put action behind their words.

As a business, we too, want to do our part, and will continue to work with nonprofits aligned with justice and positive social change. (And we're happy to work with law enforcement agencies, towards these ends.)

We’re also implementing an internship initiative aimed at fostering creative opportunities for the black community specifically. Minorities are inexcusably underrepresented in our industry and studies have cited training as a barrier to advancement.

It's a small step, but an important one to recognize and initiate.

If our brothers and sisters can’t breathe, we can’t breathe either. Let’s stand together and create the change for true, justice for all.

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